The Story of Nessie
 


The Story of Nessie

 

Nessie

 

 

Ahhh Nessie One Story everyone knows about Scotland. Or So they Think.

 

We could go on for pages and pages, the story is endless, from folklore to books, to movies, Nessie has been retold a thousand times.

 

But the real truth behind this Wee Monster is that or so they say, Nessie, is an aquatic being which reputedly inhabits Loch Ness in the Scottish Highlands.

It is similar to other supposed lake monsters in Scotland and elsewhere, and is often described as being large in size, with a long neck and one or more humps protruding from the water.

The earliest report of a monster in the vicinity of Loch Ness appears in the Life of St. Columba by Adomnán, written in the sixth century AD. According to Adomnán, writing about a century after the events described, Irish monk Saint Columba was staying in the land of the Picts with his companions when he encountered local residents burying a man by the River Ness.

They explained that the man was swimming in the river when he was attacked by a "water beast" which mauled him and dragged him underwater. Although they tried to rescue him in a boat, he was dead. Columba sent a follower, Luigne moccu Min, to swim across the river. The beast approached him, but Columba made the sign of the cross and said: "Go no further. Do not touch the man. Go back at once." The creature stopped as if it had been "pulled back with ropes" and fled, and Columba's men and the Picts gave thanks for what they perceived as a miracle.

Believers in the monster point to this story, set in the River Ness rather than the loch itself, as evidence for the creature's existence as early as the sixth century.

Modern interest in the monster was sparked by a sighting on 22 July 1933, when George Spicer and his wife saw "a most extraordinary form of animal" cross the road in front of their car.

They described the creature as having a large body (about 4 feet (1.2 m) high and 25 feet (8 m) long) and a long, wavy, narrow neck, slightly thicker than an elephant's trunk and as long as the 10–12-foot (3–4 m) width of the road. They saw no limbs. It lurched across the road towards the loch 20 yards (20 m) away, leaving a trail of broken undergrowth in its wake.

It has been claimed that sightings of the monster increased after a road was built along the loch in early 1933, bringing workers and tourists to the formerly-isolated area. Hugh Gray's photograph taken near Foyers on November 12, 1933 was the first photograph alleged to depict the monster. It was slightly blurred, and it has been noted that if one looks closely the head of a dog can be seen.

 

 

Gray Nessie

 

What ever these people saw, if anything at all, from the 1930's, the whole Nessie things took off big style.

Now that tourists were flocking to the area, stories and photos appeared, claiming to be the real Nessie.   Even to the present day there are those who are still, Just by chance coming across Nessie.

On 26 May 2007, 55-year-old laboratory technician Gordon Holmes videotaped what he said was "this jet black thing, about 14 metres (46 ft) long, moving fairly fast in the water." Adrian Shine, a marine biologist at the Loch Ness 2000 Centre in Drumnadrochit, described the footage as among "the best footage [he had] ever seen.

 

Here is a News Report on that particular incident.

 

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On 27 August 2013, tourist David Elder presented a five-minute video of a "mysterious wave" in the loch.

According to Elder, the wave was produced by a 4.5 m (15 ft) "solid black object" just under the surface of the water. Elder, 50, from East Kilbride, South Lanarkshire, was taking a picture of a swan at the Fort Augustus pier on the south-western end of the loch, when he captured the movement. 

He said, "The water was very still at the time and there were no ripples coming off the wave and no other activity on the water." Sceptics suggested that the wave may have been caused by a wind gust.  

 

 

So even to the present day we still wait to get the proof that he or she exists.

 

Maybe one day someone without trying to pull a fast one will show concrete proof that the Loch Ness Monster is ...........